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Chainbreaker is the sequel to LGBT+ friendly steampunk Timekeeper.
Timekeeper on Goodreads
Chainbreaker on Goodreads

“I’ll always fight for the promise of an easier tomorrow. Right or wrong, selfish or not, this is what we want. Whatever it takes.”

Clocktowers are mysteriously falling in India, though time is still running. The Mechanics send Danny and Daphne to investigate. (Danny quickly, willingly agrees, even if it does separate him from Colton.) Though young, they have experience – thanks to the traitor Mathias (who Danny really wishes everyone would stop calling a traitor) – with broken towers and stopped time.

First up, I gotta say that I loved the way the story was told. Last book, nearly everything was from Danny’s perspective and, while that was good, this story being told by Danny, Daphne and Colton helped both to flesh out the characters as well as the world.

And, boy, what a world it is. I’ve experienced some second books in series that feel like a setup, a stopgap for the third, and this one doesn’t suffer from that at all. (Well, okay, it does a little, merely because the ending is pretty much a cliffhanger, but it also feels like the ending of one chapter of the story and the beginning of the next. Don’t know how I’ll wait to find out what happens, though.)

Anyway, we get a lot more information on the world – instead of just based in England, a good portion takes place in India, opening up the world physically. (I don’t know much about Indian history, but I will say that Sim seems knowledgeable.) Besides that, there’s a lot more information on clock spirits which helps to flesh out the world that’s been created. I do love the way that both history and fiction blend in this story.

The characters also develop more over the course of the story, growing up a bit (mostly, Danny, though he was already a truly likable, sympathetic characters) as well as us readers getting to learn more about them. (Daphne and Colton, and their parts made me adore them even more.)

I liked the addition of some real racial diversity to this story – even if there was some before though it didn’t seem like it at the time. (A biracial character that easily passes as white.) Taking place in India, we have a lot of Indian characters that play important parts which, I think, was one of the biggest contributing factors to me liking this book just a bit more than the last one.

Well, that and the development to the world. (That I loved so, so much.)

5

 

Content Advisory: Rather clean all around. Brief animal death, some descriptions of violence. In fact, pretty heavy on the general, unexplicit violence. Brief (somewhat poetical) description of death.

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